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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
for wednesday. >> nsa whistleblower edward snowden has been charged with espionage. but he wants to be let off the hook saying they are looking to criminalize a local speech in a letter friday the northbounding sa whistleblower asked for international hope to persuade the us to give him clemency. >> he violated u.s. law. he should return to the united states and face justice. >> snowden has also indicated that he would like to testify before congress withoabout the surveillance program but lawmakers wonsay that won't hap either. >> houston taking on the colts. the texans were rolling through the first half. andre johnson pulls in his third touchdown of the game. texans up 21-3. what we told you about texan's head coach gary kubiak collapsing it's down there from houston they go on to drop their 6th straight. 27-24. raider rs taking on the eagles. it was the colts the eagles quarterback shutting down the raider's defense for a record tieing 7 touchdown passes. connecting with riley cooper for three of his 7 touchdowns. finishing the became 406 yards, 7 touchdowns no interceptions. >> it was a d
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
leaked by whistle blower edward snowden in june revealing u.s. authorities are demanding internet companies hand them user information. as long as the national security agency or the fbi are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are theirs for the searching. carefully worded denils follow from the companies, arguing that they only give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case by case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant sholling the number of sa -- showing the nsa has bypassed this, breaking into googles and yahoo!'s cables. citizens no longer receive protection awes all information is -- as all information is considered foreign. >> the government backs into the cables as a backdoor to get around the complaints. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that do exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are not a citizen, if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass do what they like. >> the white house derives the authority from ex
is not letting up. all is coming from one-time resident edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports for wjz from washington. >> reporter: a delegation from european diplomats hope to limit u.s. spying on their leaders. >> i think i have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor edward snowden released documents that revealed that the u.s. had tapped german canc lor angela merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst, james louis says the u.s
condition. what investigators have uncovered about a possible motive for that attack. >>> and edward snowden is out with a new manifesto and is asking for clemency from the u.s. why he basically says he did the american government a favor. that's next. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further dam
: the newest edward snowden documents report more spying on america's closest allies. in spain the nsa reports listening in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany a newspaper reports that president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on german chance large angela merkel's calls back in 2010 and contradicting white house assurances that the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report saying the following. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving merkel. the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness, up to now, only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i i can tell you that the president assured chancellor that the united states has not monitored and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence experts are supposed to come to the united states to challenge their counterparts on the spying after a german official accused the u.s. of breaking german law on german soil but mike rogers defended the nsa surveillance on cnn sund
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
is denying allegations from edward snowden that the agency tapped into google and yahoo! data centers. >>> and breaking news right now, from the middle east, u.n. inspectors have just reported that syria has now destroyed all of its chemical weapon production equipment. that's one day ahead of the deadline. but the country still has roughly 1,000 tons of chemical weapons, including mustard gas and sarin. it has until the middle of next year to destroy those weapons. >>> and troubling statements about the economy. the federal reserve is keeping its economic stimulus program in place for now. that means, printing more money to keep interest rates low. because it says the housing recovery is now starting to slow down, jobs are still not being created quickly enough. however, the fed is not saying just how long the stimulus will last. that uncertainty could hurt stocks on wall street today. >>> speaking of, a rollercoaster ride for facebook. its stocks soared after the company reported big profits. then, sank after the company revealed a drop in the number of teenagers using the site. >>>
operates outside of the country. >> this move comes after nsa leaker edward snowden indicated the u.s. was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel and 34 other foreign leaders. dozens of pages of top secret u.s. documents were declassified on monday. in an parent bid to show the nsa was acting legally when it gathered millions of americans phone record. >>> the obama administration is granting a six-week extension to americans who want to sign. for obama care coverage. the new deadline is march 13st and extended because the website has a number of problems. we are told the website is back up and running now. >>> when it comes to terrorism the future looks frightening. cnn obtaining a sobering new report that reveals casualty and attacks are on the rise. as chris lawrence reports, there is no end in sight to that troubling trend. >> reporter: it's not your imagination. terrorists are launching more attacks like this deadly assault on a nairobi mall. and it's likely the world will see even more violence next year. cnn obtained exclusive access to an upcoming report from stark
of revelations by former nsa analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the nsa has been collecting phone calls and text mess inls of millions of citizens. congressman james sensesenbrenner, the author of the "the patriot act" is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, stopping dragnet collection of phone calls from citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is tarted and appoint an advocate to the courts protecting rights. the director of national intelligence, james clapper, and national security director keith alexander told the committee the content of phone calls was secret in a lock box, unless there is a link to terrorism. and that, they say, is rare. >> there would only be looked at if we had reasonable and artic u la ble suspicious that we had connection to a foreign, al qaeda-related group, and look into the box. in 2012 we had 2088 such selectors, that we could look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing there was relatively little discussion about allegations that the u.s. spied on america's allies. at the white
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
with edward snowden months ago, they start eed to b very upset in germany, partly because of their history with the secret police, and partly because they thought this president would be different. they thought president obama would do some different in national security than president bush. that's colored their opinion. as former secretary of state madeleine albright has said, everybody does it, i was even bugged by the french when i was u.s. ambassador to the u.n. >> julian, should he have known if the nsa was tapping a personal cell phone of a world leader? >> certainly, the president doesn't know everything going on with the nsa, and we shouldn't expect that. but when you're talking about the surveillance of world leaders and an issue that's been controversial for a while now, you would expect that there's some knowledge, eerlth by the president or people surrounding him. he hasn't said much about the second part of that, but i do think they're surprised that this was off the radar in the inner circles of the white house. >> christiane, you point out spying, one of the world's oldest p
edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a reason why they would tell the white house there's no protocol that i
put it together, it is a lot of jerns. so a give like edward snowden could leach out a lot of intelligence just by in that field in russia. >> which is an interesting point wi . maybe they sell hats but it could be their version of the nsa. you don't always say you are what you are. that brings me to the point. we don't know what the job. is his attorney said they're with holding it for security reasons. how valuable, tim, do you think snowden is at this point as an intelligence asset for the russians? >> he is of great value. just his knowledge of how he got hired. the process of his hiring. the type of work he did. the personnel he worked. with all of those things, there's a arraign why when you're in the intelligence communicate and you have a top secret clearance or a clearance above that, why pillow talk is banned. everyone you associate. with any foreign nationals you associate with all have to be reported. the agencies have to look at that and to see if there is a possible envelope being built around that you could sap information from you. so whether he intentionall
's been talked about edward snowden getting clemency. he has asked for that. should he get clemency? >> no. he's not getting clemency. the fact he broke the law, he stole classified material. what i ask the question is, who has been fired at the nsa for being so sloppy, so negligent to allow a 29-year-old to allow a 29-year-old to walk away with highly classified material? nobody has to my knowledge. >> important question. senator leahy, thank you so much for your time this afternoon. we appreciate it. >>> coming up, big news at the supreme court. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams joins me next. stay with us. you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that h
in germany. provided the site of former nsa contractor in -- edward snowden. of 2013, but not the content. caller: great job. a listen to every morning. i just came back from europe. i know it is going on over there. -- of the isu right now, we are the most powerful country in the world are defined the president of the united states says two things i want to do. a nice dinner here and then let them know that we are not playing games with you because if you ever put a missile in my country, i will blow your head off and that is it. and it is done. you said that he just came back from overseas echo what part? caller: athens. any reactions as to how the story is playing out over there? caller: i was born there 50 years ago. .he people create the problem we keeping the same politicians back over and over again. because justts revises like everybody else, my god. give the other guy chance to get in there, to serve his country. ray from loma linda california. he is on our independent line. caller: good morning, just briefly, as far as buying is concerned i think there's a number of issues to co
, but cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto has more. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. in spain, reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany the "sontag" newspaper reports president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls back in 2010, contradicting white house assurances the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn "general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel." the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness up to now only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence officials are expected to come to the u.s.
by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. host: kevin on twitter asks -- guest: you're caller earlier talked about the boston bo
of "the washington journal." a continued clashed over the nsa -- spying leaks from edward snowden. this is the front page of "the financial times." the issue came up yesterday with the heads of the intelligence committee in the house and senate. they were asked if perhaps they would agree with some calls that have been made for edward snowden to receive clemency if he came home to the u.s. to testify in an investigation of the nsa. we will play a little bit of what chairman mike rogers and senator dianne feinstein said in that interview. [video clip] this was an all, american, contractor who was trusted and he stripped our system. if he wasopportunity a whistleblower, to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say i have some information you ought to see. maybeld certainly see him both together, maybe separately, but we would have seen him and we would have looked at that information. that did not happen. now he has done this an armistice service to our country. norma's disservice in this country and i believe in no clemen
known about it. lawmakers say new leaks from edward snowden about the u.s. intercepting phone calls from other officials are really hurting relations. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we have listened in. so i think we have repair work to do. bill: brazil's president canceled a state visit over nsa leaks that indicated her phone calls had been listened to. bill? bill: what is the white house going to respond to or how will it respond now to these leaks, wendell? >> reporter: as they dribble out piece by piece it is really hurting things. the president has ordered a review to try to balance security needs with privacy concerns. the same technology that allows the nsa to listen to al qaeda communication, allows it to track diplomats calls. it helps them most global communications are routed through the u.s. the president says essentially everybody does this. the some anger we're hearing at foreign leaders
of europe's scorn. the white house can thank nsa leaker, edward snowden. president obama has had to apologize to hollande, merkel, and current and former leaders in mexico and president ruseff who even canceled a state visit to washington she was so angry. while the nsa scandal is also causing protests at home, with european allies, it could cost serious money. the european union, america's largest trading partner, is threatening to cancel pending trade talks in the u.s. >> when we're doing this in germany, france, great britain, other nations we've been allied with in fighting al qaeda, invading libya, these kinds of things just trample trust. >> the administration and its defenders say most of the spying is legitimate for the protection of the u.s. and its allies. >> so a bad guy in afghanistan can use networks in france or germany or great britain or the united states and plan operations with somebody else who may be in afghanistan, but you could still use all of those networks. >> the nsa has issued an unusual denial of one british report that said president obama had been to
as a victory by people like edward snowden and gl glenn greenwald. >> did you talk to glenn at all? it seems a narrow view when he says is angela merkel a terrorist. you hear from the obama administration side that these intelligence services do a lot more than just only try to intercept communications amongst terrorists. there's a lot more to it. >> right. exactly. a lot of it is about the economic side. a lot of it is, you know, just trying to figure out who's meeting who and what's going on. clearly since 9/11 you and i both know that the emphasis has been on trying to disrupt any kind of plots or plans or conspiracies to commit harm against the united states, either in the u.s. or around the world. and against u.s. allies. so that is why prime minister cameron and other strong u.s. allies have been very robust in their defense of this kind of data collection. we also know that, yes, angela merkel is a strong u.s. ally, but in the past, germany has had, obviously with east germany, it was a communist country, so a lot of spying was done in relation to that. its relations and its trade and
is for david ignatius for sure. new reporting confirms what edward snowden leaked last week that the scope extends to some of america's closest allies abroad. the "wall street journal" reports that the national security agency ended a program that spied on as many as 35 world leaders after the white house ordered a review over the summer. officials say several programs have been shut down and others are expected to be close to the later date. the report states president obama spent nearly five years in office in the dark. unaware of the nsa's practices overseas. the targets of the programs are not decided by the president, but by the agency. yesterday congressman peter king defended the program saying they should be viewed as a positive thing for everyone involved. >> i think the president should stop apologizing and being defensive. the nsa saved thousands of lives not just in the united states, but in france and germany and throughout europe. we are not doing this for the fun of it, but to gather intelligence that helps not just us. >> there reports out of germany that the president did
this out, maintaining relevance in the arena, it should have been better by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. ho
operating. and the leaks which stemmed from information from former nsa contractor edward snowden just keep coming. two spanish newspapers say the nsa secretly monitored 60 million phone calls in spain just in one month. here in washington, mixed reaction from lawmakers. >> this whole notion that we're going to go after each other on what is really legitimate protection of nation/state interests, i think is disingenuous. >> we have repair work to do. >> reporter: abc news, washington. >>> congress now looking into the case against amanda knocks. two lawmakers from her state of washington holding a panel discussion on capitol hill as the retrial of knox is underway in italy without her. knox was convicted of killing her british roommate in 2009. her sentence was overturned after she served of course years. an italian court ordered a new trial. >>> a federal judge in texas has struck down a major part of the state's restrictive new abortion law. advocates say a provision requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital less than 30 miles away would have shuttered about 1/3 of the
't know about it until nsa leaker edward snowden revealed the u.s. was spying on other allies including leaders of mexico and brazil. the president says just because the nation's spy agencies are able to listen in on phone conversations doesn't necessarily mean they should. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: the state department says the nsa spying disclosures have raised what they call a spokeswoman called significant challenges in some of these country's most important relationships and partnerships. brazil's president canceled a state visit over the snooping. jenna? jenna: worth pointing out editorial pages for conserve-leaning, liberal-leaning writers taken issue with this. some president's critics calling him the bystander president. why is that? >> reporter: the republican national committee strung together a group of problems that seemed to h
stems from edward snowden and all of these documents. there is another one out this morning that suggests that the u.s. was listening into some 60 million calls in spain over a year. so you have real problems diplomatically from this. >> it's unbelievable, too. like the peter king method of embracing it. it's called a hamburg cell, we need to embrace it and listening in. >> listen to them, don't listen to us. >> he said stop apologizing for this. >> have a great program, bret baier's program runs at 6:00 o'clock eastern time right here on the fox news channel. we're all big fans of that. >> have a good day. >> now for the rest of headline, we'll go to heather nauert. >> good morning to you. it looks like such a beautiful day in washington, d.c michael jackson's former doctor walking free. conrad murray was released from an l.a. county jail at midnight. this video shows him driving away inside of a cop car. murray served just two years of his four-year prison sentence for giving jackson a deadly dose of propothol. what's raising eyebrows, murray says he's planning to try to g
nature of the revelation. >> reporter: edward snowden's revelation wills keep coming, says snowden's intermediary glen green wald. >> there's documents in the troef that we have pertaining to virtually every single country in europe, south america, central america, asia, and the middle east, and we intend to report most of that. >> there's a lot more to come. former and current officials say other countries, of course, also spy on us, but clearly not to the extent of the nsa's sweeping data collection. the message from europe, the targeting of friendly foreign leaders has destroyed trust with the u.s., leading some to not believe the u.s.'s claim that the president was unaware of this program until recently. >> andrea mitchell in washington. thank you. >>> we have new developments in the search for four escaped prisoners in oklahoma. two of the men are still at large. nbc's kerry sanders has details on that. good morning to you. >> well, good morning, matt. two of them remain at large, but two others were picked up. the escapees found about 20 miles from here. they're back in the j
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)